Third anonymous juror from Breonna Taylor case speaks out to promote “transparency”

A third anonymous grand juror from the Breonna Taylor case on Friday joined two others in speaking publicly about the case, supporting the claim that no additional charges were presented to the jury, according to a law firm representing the juror.

“After much reflection, Anonymous Grand Juror #3 has joined Anonymous Grand Jurors #1 and #2 in promoting truth and transparency regarding the Breonna Taylor case. Anonymous Grand Juror #3 firmly supports the fact that no additional charges were allowed at the conclusion of their service. The legal team for the three Grand Jurors will continue to protect their anonymity and aid them in their courageous efforts,” said the statement issued by the Glogower Law Office. 

The news comes days after Juror No. 1 and No. 2 spoke exclusively with CBS News, asserting they were never given the option to consider murder or manslaughter charges for the officers directly involved in Taylor’s death. 

“It was a betrayal,” Juror No. 2 said. “They didn’t give us the charges upfront… when they gave us all of that testimony, over 20-something hours, and then to say that these are the only charges that they’re coming up with, it’s like, ‘Well, what did we just sit through?'”

Taylor, a Black emergency medical technician, was shot and killed in her Louisville, Kentucky, home during a police raid in March. Officers used a no-knock warrant to enter the home, looking for her ex-boyfriend. No officers were charged in Taylor’s death. However, one officer, Brett Hankison, was fired and charged with wanton endangerment for shooting into Taylor’s apartment from outside.

Both Juror No. 1 and No. 2 said they felt compelled to speak out after Cameron said in a September news conference that six possible homicide charges under Kentucky law weren’t applicable to the two officers who opened fire from Taylor’s doorway because they were acting in self-defense. Cameron claimed the grand jury agreed. 

Juror No. 1 told CBS News the news conference was the “first time” he heard any mention of “six possible murder charges” and that, “It was not presented to us.” Juror No. 2 said he felt “this was all Cameron.”

One officer, Brett Hankison, was with three counts of wanton endangerment for endangering Taylor’s neighbors when he fired bullets into Taylor’s apartment from outside.

A judge recently denied Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s motion to prevent the jurors from speaking about the case. Judge Annie O’Connell noted that 15 hours of grand jury recordings have already been made public in the case and said Cameron’s concern that further disclosures could impair a fair trial for Hankison is not “founded in reality.”

Erin Donaghue contributed reporting.

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